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Re: Routing Policy and http://rs.arin.net/ip-allocation.html

  • From: Michael Gibson
  • Date: Thu May 07 03:34:20 1998

As part of Canadian Internet Community, we have been following the CIDR
guidelines.  We also do not route IPs from other CIDR blocks.

Michael Gibson
Sr. Network Admin - Netcom Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Dillon <michael@memra.com>
To: nanog@merit.edu <nanog@merit.edu>
Date: Wednesday, May 06, 1998 5:13 PM
Subject: Re: Routing Policy and http://rs.arin.net/ip-allocation.html


>On Wed, 6 May 1998, Mark Kent wrote:
>
>> That is the wrong question to ask.  The real question is who has been
>> handing out 206.116/16 like they were dealing cards?  A quick look
>> at the announcments and in whois.arin.net reveals a bunch of /24
>> spread out over Canada.
>
>This is because historically, addresses in Canada were handed out without
>regard to CIDR even after everyone else was doing CIDR allocations. A
>couple of years ago the Canadian IP registry was shut down and allocations
>since that time have followed CIDR guidelines more closely. If you want to
>see an excellent example of the kind of things that used to happen, have a
>look at "whois -h whois.arin.net 199.166.227". In 1994 I applied for a
>CIDR block of two Class C's, i.e. a /23 and this is what I got. Look
>closely now... If you still can't see the problem try writing both /24's
>in binary one above the other.
>
>> Historically, and currently, the Canadians crowd the top of
>> the Tony Bates cidr list.  Why is that?
>
>Part of it is because of the above allocation problem but another large
>part of the problem is a severe lack of clue. Not enough Canadians go to
>NANOG meetings to learn how to run a network properly, especially at the
>Canadian backbone providers. Even when there were 10 provincial backbones
>within the CA*NET consortium, the knowledge transfer just did not take
>place. In some provinces like Ontario the network operators seemed more
>interested in socialist politics than in running a network properly.
>
>Things are a bit better now in some regions and in some companies but
>there is still a lot more knowledge sharing that could be done.
>
>And if anyone wants to flame me for this, please don't inflict it on the
>NANOG list. Instead, come see me in person this weekend at the 12th annual
>Canadian Internet conference http://www.net98.bc.ca and tell me what a
>twit I am. I'll even buy you a beer.
>
>--
>Michael Dillon                   -               Internet & ISP Consulting
>http://www.memra.com             -               E-mail: michael@memra.com
>
>
>