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NANOG Meeting Presentation Abstract

Newcomers\' Orientation and Reception
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-03 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Room: Lake Washington
Presenters: Speakers:
Betty Burke, NANOG Project Chair at MERIT.
William B. Norton, Equinix.
Abstract: Welcome & Introduction to NANOG , Steve Feldman, PC Chair MERIT Report, Betty Burke, Nanog Project Chair at MERIT NANOG History, William B. Norton, Equinix
Files: pdfNANOG History(PDF)
pdfNewcomer Meeting - MERIT Report(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Video Internet: The Next Wave of Disruption to the U.S. Peering Ecosystem
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 9:15am - 9:45am
Room: Grand Ballroom Foyer
Presenters: Speakers:

Willliam B. Norton, Equinix

Bill Norton is Co-Founder and Chief Technical Liaison for Equinix. He focuses on research on large-scale interconnection and ISP peering, and in particular, scaling Internet operations using optical networking. Bill has published and presented his research in a variety of international forums. From 1987 to 1998, he served in several staff and managerial roles at Merit Network, directing national and international network research and operations activities and serving as NANOG coordinator. Bill received a B.A. in Computer Science and an M.B.A. from the Business School at the University of Michigan, and has been an active member of the Internet Engineering Task Force for the past 15 years.
Abstract: In previous research we documented three significant disruptions to the U.S. Peering Ecosystem as the Cable Companies, Large Scale Network Savvy Content Companies, and Tier 2 ISPs started peering openly. By peering content directly with eyeballs, they effectively bypassed the Tier 1 ISPs resulting in improved performance, greater control over the end-user experience, and overall lower operating costs. This paper predicts a new wave of disruption that potentially dwarfs this previous redirection of Internet traffic. Short video clip web sites, full length motion pictures, and television shows are now available via streaming to on-line devices and via downloading to iPods. More sites are coming on-line High quality movies from independent producers are being distributed via peer-to-peer methods. We observe these flash crowd effects and the larger movie file sizes as the crest of the first wave of significant incremental load on the Internet. The majority of this paper details four models for Internet Video Distribution (Transit, Content Delivery Networks, Transit/Peering/DIY CDN, Peer2Peer) across three load models. The cost models include network and server equipment along with pricing models for various distribution methods. Over one hundred walkthroughs of this paper have led to stepwise refinements of the models and insights into why one would prefer or not prefer one model over the other. The summary of the paper is a comparison of these video distribution techniques in terms of \$-per-video units from the Video Service Provider perspective. We highlight cascading obstacles preventing large scale delivery of video traffic using commodity transit in a single location. The CDN solution and the multi-site Transit with Peering solution bypass some of these obstacles, while the peer-2-peer solution, while controversial, yields (by far) the lowest cost solution from the video service provider perspective.
Files: xlsData Calculations(XLS)
pdfVideo Internet(PDF)
mp4Video Internet(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Panel: Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 9:45am - 10:45am
Room:  
Presenters: Moderators:

Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications

Richard Steenbergen is the Co-Founder of nLayer Communications, where he currently serves as Chief Technical Officer and devotes a significant amount of time to the strategic management of peering and transit relationships. Previously, he served as a Sr. Network Engineer for several large NSPs, and was the Sr. Software Engineer responsible for developing optimized routing technologies at netVmg, Inc.
Panelists:

Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks

Greg Hankins is Director, Technical Marketing for Force10 Networks. He is responsible for working with ISPs and IXs around the world as a consulting engineer and product evangelist.

Drew Perkins, Infinera

Drew Perkins serves as founder and CTO for Infinera. Previously, Mr. Perkins was a founder of and served as the CTO for both OnFiber Communications and Lightera Networks. OnFiber developed some of the world\'s largest metro DWDM networks and recently merged with Qwest Communications. Lightera developed the CoreDirector optical switch and merged with Ciena. The CoreDirector is currently deployed at many of the world\'s tier 1 carriers. Mr. Perkins has also served as Vice Chairman of the Optical Internet working Forum (OIF) Technical Committee from its inception through its first year of operation. Mr. Perkins was the principal architect of numerous TCP/IP, ATM, Ethernet hardware and software products and protocols at FORE Systems, Inc. Throughout his career, Mr. Perkins has participated extensively in standards bodies including the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), IEEE, ATM Forum, OIF and ANSI. Mr. Perkins has 25 years of industry involvement and is well known for authoring the PPP Protocol, which continues to be one of the standard that is used to link the Internet together.

Igor Gashinsky, Yahoo!

Igor Gashinsky is a principal architect at Yahoo!, a global content provider, where he is involved in projects ranging from overall network design (including highly resilient switching and routing architecture, peering, MPLS, L4-7 loadbalancing), as well as scalable content delivery methodologies and DNS architecture.
Lane Patterson, Equinix.
Abstract: A debate over the merits of 40G vs 100G technology. Still assembling panelists, but would expect to see some major vendor and customer proponents on both sides, as well as some \"neutral\" third parties to discuss the difficulties at the optical and ASIC layers.
Files: pdfDrew Perkins Presentation(PDF)
pdfGreg Hankins Presentation(PDF)
mp4Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G(MP4)
pdfHigher Speed Ethernet Panel Intro(PDF)
pdfIgor Gashinsky Presentation(PDF)
pdfLane Patterson Presentation(PDF)
pdfRichard Steenbergen Presentation(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
A DNS Anomaly Detection and Analysis System
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 11:40am - 12:10am
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:
Shin Hyo-Jeong, KT.
Abstract: As the number of the DNS servers or server farms an ISP operates increases, it has become difficult to detect DNS anomalies among the servers and resolve the problem as soon as possible, thus bringing the needs of a centralized monitoring system. For the purpose, we developed an anomaly analysis system to deploy it on individual DNS server farm of KT, and a centralized anomaly detection system to gather the analyzed results and generate the information to identify DNS anomalies. The anomaly analysis system monitors its associated DNS server farm 24 hours a day, 365 days of a year by capturing all DNS packets and inspecting their contents, while the centralized system detects whether there is any anomaly found with the data provided by the individual anomaly analysis systems. The parameters we collected for the analysis include distribution of query types, the ratio of resolved queries, and so on.
Files: pdfA DNS Anomaly Detection and Analysis System(PDF)
mp4A DNS Anomaly Detection and Analysis System(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Revisiting Interdomain Root Cause Analysis from multiple vantage points
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 12:10pm - 12:40pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Mickael Meulle, France Telecom R&D

Mickael Meulle received a B.A. in Physics, a M.S. and Ph. D in Computer Science from the Blaise Pascal University, Clermont-Ferrand (France), in 2000, 2003 and 2007, respectively. Mickael also received an Engineer Diploma from Institut Supérieur d\'Informatique et de Mathématique Appliquées, Clermont Ferrand (France) in 2003. The M.S. and Ph. D. thesis were pursued at Orange Labs, Issy-Les-Moulineaux (France) and are dealing with discovery of Internet topology, inference of Internet routing policies and Internet provider business relationships. Mickael became a member of CORE/CPN research staff at Orange Labs after completion of the Ph.D.
Abstract: We present a new methodology to detect and localize events that affect interdomain routing. While it is still based on the analysis of BGP updates collected at different monitoring points like other previous works, every other aspect of the method is part of our contribution. First, measuring both long and short term interdomain routing behavior, we point out key features in interdomain routing stability and reachability. Then, we derive empirical criteria from these characteristics to analyze each and every update (not only bursts) as they come along. Our method is therefore free from any kind of arbitrary thresholds. What is more, the method has been designed to throw an alarm as early as possible, once an event has been detected with a succinct accuracy. We test our method, analyzing a month of updates collected by sixteen routers in various ASs. Validation, which is somewhat tricky in interdomain root cause analysis is realized upon outage tickets from a Tier1 AS.
Files: pdfRevisiting Interdomain Root Cause Analysis(PDF)
mp4Revisiting Interdomain Root Cause Analysis(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
ISP Security
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Moderators:

Danny McPherson, Arbor Networks

Danny McPherson is Chief Research Officer with Arbor Networks. He\'s active within the Internet Operations, Security and Standardization community.

Kevin Lanning, AT&T

Kevin Lanning is a Technical Specialist for AT&T Labs IP Network Security Group, and responsible for Denial of Service protection in AT&T\'s core networks, monitoring all connections into and out of the AT&T group of ASN\'s. Prior to mergers and assignment to AT&T Labs, he had responsibility for IP Network Security Planning and Architecture at SBC.
Abstract: Security incidents are a daily event for Internet Service Providers. Attacks on an ISP\'s customers, attacks from an ISP\'s customer, worms, BOTNETs, and attacks on the ISP\'s infrastructure are now one of many\"security\" NOC tickets throughout the day. This increase in the volume and intensity of attacks has forced ISP\'s to spend constrained resources to mitigate the effects of these attacks on their operations and services. This investment has helped minimize the effects of the attacks, but it has not helped stop them at the source. Stopping attacks at their source requires rapid and effective inter-ISP cooperation. Hence, these ISP Security BOFs are also used as a face-to-face sync up meeting for the NSP-SEC forum. <BR><BR> Defined topics to be discussed during this ISP Security BOF include: <UL> <LI> Agenda Bashing</LI> <LI> Estonian Attack Overview - Merike Kaeo</LI> <LI> SP CALEA Issues; Challenges & Future - Chris Morrow (moderator)</LI> <LI> ISPs and CPE/Consumer-side Protection & Mitigation</LI> <LI> February 6/7, 2007 DNS Attack Recap - John Kristoff</LI> <LI> Quarterly Attack Statistics Update - Danny McPherson</LI> <LI> Open Discussion <BR><BR></LI> </UL>
Files: None.
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: BGP Techniques for Service Providers (Part 1)
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Lake Washington
Presenters: Speakers:

Philip Smith, Cisco Systems

Philip Smith has been with Cisco Systems since 1998 and is based in Brisbane, Australia. He is a Consulting Engineer, part of the Service Provider Architectures Group in Corporate Development. His role includes working with many ISPs in the Asia Pacific region, specifically in network strategies, technology, design and operations, configuration and scaling. As part of an ISP and Internet education initiative, Philip runs several Routing and Internet Technology Workshops in the Asia Pacific region. He also assists as co-instructor at similar events in many other parts of the world. Philip also is closely involved in regional activities, being chair of the APRICOT Management Committee, chair of APOPS, member of the organizing and programme committees for SANOG and PacNOG, as well as chair of APNIC\'s Routing and Internet Exchange Point Special Interest Groups. Prior to joining Cisco, he spent five years at PIPEX (now integrated into MCI\'s global network business), the UK\'s first commercial Internet Service Provider. He was one of the first engineers working in the commercial Internet in the UK, and played a key role in building the modern Internet in Europe.
Abstract: The tutorial introduces service providers to some more advanced BGP features and techniques to aid with operating their networks within the Internet. After a recap of iBGP, eBGP and common attributes, the tutorial will look at the various scaling techniques available, when to use BGP instead of an IGP, and examine policy options available through the use of local preference, MED and communities. The tutorial then looks at deployment techniques, including aggregation, announcing and receiving prefixes, pressure points on the routing system, and some of the newer features available.
Files: pdfBGP Techniques for Service Providers(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
IPv6 Unique Local Address
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-04 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Randy Bush, IIJ

Randy Bush works as Principal Scientist at Internet Initiative Japan. Previously he spent a bit over a year at AT&T doing research and working on network architecture. He got some operational experience from being on the founding team at Verio, a backbone provider, from which he graduated as VP of Networking after five years. Before that, he was the principal engineer of RAINet, an ISP in Oregon and Washington, which was Verio\'s first acquisition. As PI for the Network Startup Resource Center, an NSF-supported pro bono effort, he has been involved for some years with the deployment and integration of appropriate networking technology in the developing world.
Abstract: ULA-C has been an active discussion on the RIR lists as well as leaking into the NANOG fora. There is both policy and operational impact of ULAs, and, as usual, there is a tension between the two. <BR><BR> <STRONG>Agenda:</STRONG><UL> <LI> What are ULAs?</LI> <LI> What is ULA-C?</LI> <LI> Pros</LI> <LI> Cons</LI> <LI> Discussion</LI> </UL>
Files: pdfIPv6 Unique Local Address(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
sFlow implementation at AMS-IX
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 11:10am - 11:40am
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Elisa Jasinska, AMS-IX

Elisa Jasinska is an engineer at the Amsterdam Internet Exchange. She has been working on the hand-coded sFlow software for AMS-IX since last year. The AMS-IX is a Layer 2 platform providing the facilities for over 250 parties to peer with each other. The non-profit organization is based at 4 independent collocations in Amsterdam.
Abstract: sFlow is a relatively new but more and more popular standard to capture traffic data in switched or routed networks. It uses a sampling technology to collect statistics from the device and is for that reason applicable to gigabit speeds or higher. AMS-IX implemented a traffic flow visualization service for it\'s members based on sFlow data. Due to the high and constantly increasing throughput on the AMS-IX platform the implementation was focused on performance as well as on scalability. This talk describes the implementation of the tools, visualization to the members and the benefits for traffic engineering within the exchange gained from sFlow data.
Files: pdfsFlow implementation at AMS-IX(PDF)
mp4sFlow implementation at AMS-IX(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Revisiting AS ranking
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 11:40am - 12:10pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Mickael Meulle, France Telecom R&D

Mickael Meulle received a B.A. in Physics, a M.S. and Ph. D in Computer Science from the Blaise Pascal University, Clermont-Ferrand (France), in 2000, 2003 and 2007, respectively. Mickael also received an Engineer Diploma from Institut Supérieur d\'Informatique et de Mathématique Appliquées, Clermont Ferrand (France) in 2003. The M.S. and Ph. D. thesis were pursued at Orange Labs, Issy-Les-Moulineaux (France) and are dealing with discovery of Internet topology, inference of Internet routing policies and Internet provider business relationships. Mickael became a member of CORE/CPN research staff at Orange Labs after completion of the Ph.D.
Abstract: The Internet network is composed of tens of thousands Autonomous Systems (AS) networks. Each AS establishes links with other AS to learn routes toward any destination in the whole Internet. Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is responsible for the propagation of reachability informations (routes to address ranges) originated by all AS in the Internet. Routing policies of ASs and the AS-level network topology are unknown, but they shape the possible BGP paths learned and used by routers and though end-to-end flows of IP packets in the network. The position of an AS in the Internet hierarchy determines its reachability profile to the hundreds of thousands destinations in the Network. We study here a new algorithm to compute an AS ranking that evaluates the average transit operated by an AS in BGP routing. This ranking can be used for decision support in (re-)negotiation of business agreements between AS.
Files: pdfRevisiting AS ranking(PDF)
mp4Revisiting AS ranking(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Modeling the Routing of an ISP with C-BGP
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 12:10pm - 12:25pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Bruno Quoitin, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Bruno Quoitin is a research fellow at UCL (Belgium). His current research is in the area of inter-domain routing and network modeling. He received his B.S. degree in Mathematics and his Master degree in Computer Science from FUNDP in 1999. He worked at DTI in the field of industrial network management for 2 years, until returning in the academic world where he obtained his Ph.D, in 2006 from UCL.
Abstract: Today, the complexity of ISPs\' networks make it difficult to investigate the implications of internal or external changes on the distribution of the traffic across their network. In this talk, we present an open-source routing solver, called C-BGP, that eases the investigation of changes in the routing or the topology of large networks. We illustrate how to build a model of a real transit network. Then, we use the model to evaluate two different \"what-if\" scenarios. The first scenario studies the impact of changes in the Internet connectivity of the transit network (peering placement). The second investigates the impact of failures in its internal topology on the traffic distribution.
Files: pdfBrunoQuoitin-ModelingTheRoutingOfAnISP(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Path Splicing with Network Splicing
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 12:25pm - 12:40pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Nick Feamster, Georgia Tech University

Nick Feamster is an assistant professor in the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in Computer science from MIT in 2005, and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2000 and 2001, respectively. His research focuses on many aspects of computer networking and networked systems, including the design, measurement, and analysis of network routing protocols, network security, anonymous communication systems, and adaptive streaming media protocols. His honors include award papers at SIGCOMM 2006 (network-level behavior of spammers), the NSDI 2005 conference (fault detection in router configuration), Usenix Security 2002 (circumventing web censorship using Infranet), and Usenix Security 2001 (web cookie analysis).
Murtaza Motiwala, Georgia Tech University.
Santosh Vempala, Georgia Tech University.
Abstract: We present path splicing, a new routing primitive that allows network paths to be constructed from multiple independent routing processes that run over a single network topology. Path splicing computes multiple independent routing trees by randomly perturbing link weights and, using network virtualization, runs multiple routing protocols in parallel slices, which collectively insert entries into a shared forwarding table. Using a small number of additional bits in packet headers, end systems can then redirect traffic between forwarding tables at any hop in the network. By allowing paths to be ``spliced\'\' by assembling segments from each of these trees, path splicing achieves exponential improvements in path diversity with only a linear increase in state and message complexity. Our evaluation of path splicing on several realistic ISP topologies demonstrates a dramatic increase in reliability that approaches the best possible using only a small number of slices and for only a small increase in latency. We also describe the implementation and deployment of path splicing on the VINI testbed.
Files: pdfPath Splicing with Network Splicing(PDF)
mp4Path Splicing with Network Splicing(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: How to Update Wireshark
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Aamer Akhter, Cisco Systems

Aamer Akhter, joined Cisco Systems, Inc. in 1998 after graduating from Georgia Tech with a Bachelor\'s of Science in electrical engineering. After joining the Technical Assistance Center (TAC), he has worked in various capacities for cisco supporting large service provider and enterprise customers, as well as testing, designing and deploying several large Layer 2 and MPLS/VPN networks. Mr. Akhter is currently working as a technical marketing engineer in the areas of Network Virtualization, Wan-Optimization and router instrumentation. He is CCIE number 4543.
Abstract: In today\'s networks there are an increasing number of new protocols and changes to existing protocol changes occurring on an almost daily basis. One of the tried and tested methods of diagnosing problems by networking professionals is using a \'network analyzer\' or sniffer. However, with the velocity of protocol changes the protocol analyser may not have been updated to decode the new formats. This problem is even more common in our test and validation labs. This presentation will give a overview of how Wireshark works from a user perspective. From the developer perspective, layout of the code, commonly used functions, and a walk through of extending Wireshark to support MVPN (multicast VPN) decoding of BGP. Wireshark is free and licensed under GPL.
Files: pdfAamer Akhter Presentation(PDF)
mp4How to Update Wireshark(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
BGP Tools
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Lake Washington
Presenters: Speakers:

Daniel Massey, Colorado State University

Dr. Dan Massey is an assistant professor at Colorado State University. Dr. Massey\'s research investigates large-scale infrastructure problems including BGP routing as well as other infrastructure such as DNS and future network designs. He is currently PI on several projects funded by the National Science Foundation and some of this work has been presented at previous NANOG meetings. Dr. Massey’s contact information is dvmtthws@cs.colostate.edu. Dave Matthews is a PhD student at Colorado State University. He contributed to the design and implementation of BGPMonitor. Dave is employed by Hewlett-Packard in the Office of Strategy & Technology. At HP he led early development efforts in HP\'s OpenView program, including Network Node Manager. Lihua Yuan is currently a PhD Candidate in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Davis. He received his Bachelor\'s degree in electrical and Electronics Engineering from Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) and Master\'s degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from National University of Singapore (Singapore). His research interests are in systems that assist network measurement and management. Dr. Chen-Nee Chuah is currently an Associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of California, Davis (UCD). Her research interests are in the area of computer networking and distributed systems, Internet measurements, overlay/peer-to-peer systems, network security, and wireless/mobile networking. Chuah has served as PI/Co-PI on several NSF funded projects, including an NSF CAREER Award in 2003. The FIREMAN tool is developed with funding from NSF NeTS project (2005-08).
Abstract: In recent years various non-commercial tools have been developed to collected and analyze BGP data. When combined with BGP data collected by individual ISPs as well as by public archives such as RouteViews and RIPE RIS, these tools can potentially provide invaluable insight into the operations of inter-domain routing. The fifth BGP Analysis Tools BOF builds on the potential of these tools by fostering a closer interaction between non-commercial tool developers and the potential users represented by NANOG attendees. <BR><BR> The BoF is organized as a series of short presentations and is followed by hands-on demonstrations. This BoF features the FIREMAN, LinkRank, Datapository, and BGPMonitor. Following the presentations, the tool developers will be available for tool demonstrations and discussions. <BR><BR> <STRONG>Featured Tools: </STRONG> <BR><BR> FIREMAN (FIREwall Modeling and ANalysis): Firewalls have become indispensable security defense mechanisms for business and enterprise networks. Just as router mis-configurations can lead to unpredictable routing problems, misconfigured firewalls may fail to enforce the intended security policies or present a performance bottleneck. Unfortunately, firewall configuration for a large, complex enterprise network is a demanding and error-prone task, even for experienced administrators. Previous studies show that misconfigurations, e.g. policy violations, inconsistencies, and inefficiencies are common cases. <BR><BR> We have developed a scalable static analysis toolkit for FIREwall Modeling and ANalysis called FIREMAN. FIREMAN takes a set of firewall configurations as specialized programs and applies static analysis techniques to check all types of misconfigurations, in individual firewalls as well as among distributed firewalls. The symbolic model checking performed by FIREMAN covers all possible IP packets and along all possible data paths and therefore is both sound and complete. We have used FIREMAN to uncover several real misconfigurations in enterprise/ISP networks <BR><BR> <STRONG>Link-Rank:</STRONG> <BR><BR> A new version of Link-Rank was recently released with a new set of features and functions on top of the previous release 2 years ago. Link-Rank is an open source java based visualization toolset for monitoring and diagnosing large-scale BGP routing changes. By weighing AS-AS links using number of BGP routes carried, and tracking the changes in these weights, Link-Rank produces easy-to-understand visual representations of aggregate route changes along different AS paths. <BR><BR> Link-Rank graphs are easy to navigate and built-in data filters can be tailor graphs to different granularity level and target prefix sets. One of the important new features is semi-realtime display of the routing changes as soon as BGP data from Oregon RouteViews collector becomes available. Link-Rank code package also enables individual operators to use the code on BGP data from individual ISPs, providing continuous monitoring of BGP routing dynamics in near real time. The new release also added the function of saving graph snapshots with a note, and load them in again at a later time for further analysis. <BR><BR> <STRONG>Datapository:</STRONG> <BR><BR> Internet measurement data provides the foundation for the operation and planning of the networks that comprise the Internet, and is a necessary component in research for analysis, simulation, and emulation. Despite its critical role, however, the management of this data from collection and transmission to storage and its use within applications remains primarily ad hoc, using techniques created and re-created by each corporation or researcher that uses the data. We examine several of the challenges faced when attempting to collect and archive large volumes of network measurement data. We present an architecture for an Internet data repository the \"datapository\" designed to create a framework for collaboratively addressing these challenges. <BR><BR> <STRONG>BGPMonitor:</STRONG> <BR><BR> BGPMonitor combines a light weight BGP listener with a new XML log format and offers several advantages over using existing BGP monitoring packages. First, as a light weight system designed to simply maintain a peering session and log all received updates, the code is small and fast (as compared to a full BGP implementation). Second, the system is designed to scale by allowing multiple BGPMonitors to chain together. This allows monitoring tools to interact with a single BGP monitor. Third, the log formats include both the existing MRT format and new XML log format. The XML format makes the data easy to view without requiring a translation step (such as bgpdump), allows one to easily annotate the data such as adding a label to distinguish between duplicate updates and AS path changes, and can be fed directly into a growing set of XML aware tools and packages. One concern is the XML format may take substantially more space than the more compact binary representation, but perhaps surprisingly, the compressed XML format actually requires less storage space the compressed MRT logs making long term storage of BGP logs more efficient.
Files: None.
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: BGP Communities for Service Providers
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Lake Chelan
Presenters: Speakers:

Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications

Richard Steenbergen is the Co-Founder of nLayer Communications, where he currently serves as Chief Technical Officer and devotes a significant amount of time to the strategic management of peering and transit relationships. Previously, he served as a Sr. Network Engineer for several large NSPs, and was the Sr. Software Engineer responsible for developing optimized routing technologies at netVmg, Inc.
Tom Scholl, AT&T Labs.
Abstract: A discussion about BGP community systems for Service Providers. Covers the design and implementation considerations of many powerful features, and provides examples for Cisco and Juniper implementations.
Files: pdfBGP Communities for Service Providers(PDF)
mp4BGP Communities for Service Providers(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Peering BOF XVII
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Room: Lake Washington
Presenters: Speakers:

William B. Norton, Equinix

Bill Norton is Co-Founder and Chief Technical Liaison for Equinix. He focuses on research on large-scale interconnection and ISP peering, and in particular, scaling Internet operations using optical networking. Bill has published and presented his research in a variety of international forums. From 1987 to 1998, he served in several staff and managerial roles at Merit Network, directing national and international network research and operations activities and serving as NANOG coordinator. Bill received a B.A. in Computer Science and an M.B.A. from the Business School at the University of Michigan, and has been an active member of the Internet Engineering Task Force for the past 15 years.
Abstract: Welcome - 10 minutes - Bill Norton - Agenda Bashing and Observations Anonymous Survey and Discussion - 5 minutes - Bill Norton - On behalf of an anonymous community member who is employer mute would like to know 1) Who is using graceful restart on their BGP peering sessions? 2) Why graceful restart is a good idea? 3) Why graceful restart is a bad idea? PeeringDB.com Presentation - 10 minutes - Terry Rodery (BitGravity) - an update on the function and enhancement of this community contact information database. UnderHanded Peering Techniques - 10 minutes - Jim Deleskie (VSNL) - some updates to the Art of Peering white paper detailing some of the more unusual tactics seen in the field. Peering in Seattle Presentation- 10 minutes - Patrick Gilmore (Akamai) - Since we are all near Seattle, a major peering location in the U.S., Patrick will review the peering landscape in Seattle. Specifically - Why peer in Seattle? Where do folks peer in Seattle? What is different about peering in Seattle? What ASes are uniquely available here? Any gotchas. lessons learned? Peering BOF HotSeat Topic - Transit Survey(s) - 10 Minutes - Joe Provo - Here we to perform another survey that will hopefully mitigate the privacy concerns while still providing interesting useful data. Additional topics as they come up at NANOG. Send email to bill.norton at gmail.com if you want to volunteer to facilitate a short peering discussion. Peering Spotlight - remainder of the time - ALL - for Peering Coordinators that are just starting peering with their AS in the US we have a few minutes for them to introduce themselves to the group. This will provide a chance for them to be approached by active peers in the room as we break. ------------------------------------------------- Still TBD... Here are the ideas without someone to volunteer to step up and lead the discussion. Add your name if you would volunteer.... ------------------------------------------------- Is peering with the eyeball networks becoming more difficult with all the mergers. SBC used to be selective, now with BellSouth and AT&T, present more eyeballs and presumably is more restrictive. Likewise with Adelphia, Time Warner/Roadrunner merging and Verizon/MCI/UUNet, are we seeing a tightening of peering with eyeball networks? (Need a discussion leader here) Peering Capacity Upgrade - The Peering Community often upgrades peering capacity when utilization reaches 60%/75%/80%...but what do folks find is the right number? When should folks upgrade from 1G to 10G public peering or 1G to n*1G private peering? (from boggits-8468) Pros and Cons of hot potato routing for video traffic (i.e. relying on the quality your own vs. your peers network) (from Remco-16243) VOIP Peering Requests - while voip is still in its infancy it continues to be a growth area and companies make money from it. This sub topic will explore the practical side of peering voice traffic. (from ren-8172) Multicast Peering - as bandwidth for video becomes a constraint, is it time for multicast to be considered as an efficient inter-as distribution? (from Niels) Jumbo frames - should we explore big mtu VLANs for peering this traffic? (from Niels) -- YES! Small MTU\'s are a waste! (Martin) Do shared Route Servers make sense anymore? (from Niels) A random walk through IRC Peering Topics and Discussions - what are the peering coordinators discussing these days? Peering Debate - a staple of the Peering BOF, this section identifies an interesting topic for which there are two diametrically opposing views. Two debaters are recruited to present the strongest case on each side and the audience votes on which side presented the most compelling case. Then we discuss points that didn\'t come up or were not made strongly enough. How about peering point support for carriers that have 10G, and potentially 40G, undersea cable backbones arriving in the US at the Pacific or Atlantic coasts. (Martin)
Files: pdfMinutes from the Session(PDF)
pdfPatrick Gilmore Presentation(PDF)
pdfTerry Rodery Presentation(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Community Meeting
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-05 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:
Randy Bush, Acting SC Chair.
Steve Feldman, PC Chair.
Aleksandr Pilosov, Acting MLC Chair.
Betty Burke, NANOG Project Chair at MERIT.
Abstract: Steering Committee Report, Randy Bush, Acting SC Chair Program Committee Report, Steve Feldman, PC Chair Mailing List Committee Report, Aleksandr Pilosov, Acting MLC Chair MERIT Administrative Report, Betty Burke, Nanog Project Chair at MERIT
Files: pdfAleksandr Pilosov Community Presentation(PDF)
pdfBetty Burke Community Presentation(PDF)
mp4Community Meeting(MP4)
pdfRandy Bush Community Presentation(PDF)
pdfSteve Feldman Community Presentation(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
High availability multicast delivery in IPTV networks
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 9:00am - 9:30am
Room: Grand Ballroom Foyer
Presenters: Speakers:

Peter Arberg, Redback Networks

Peter Arberg is Director, Architecture & Standards within Redback Networks. Prior to joining Redback, Peter Arberg worked as a Network Consultant for Cisco Systems and has also worked in both government and enterprise business implementing IP and MPLS networks.
Abstract: In IPTV networks it is important to be able to make efficient and reliable multicast deliver. Different functionalities exist for being able to deliver multicast traffic through networks, MPLS P2MP is one such option where MPLS FRR can be used to protect multicast traffic from network failures, another solution is a functionality we call PIM Dual Join multicast streams. This presentation will go into discussions on these 2 functionalities and try and highlight benefits of each solution and also provide some test numbers for multicast traffic recovery in different failure scenarios.
Files: mp4High availability multicast delivery in IPTV networks(MP4)
pdfPeter Arberg Presentation(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
BGP Origins - An Application of the Public Space
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 9:30am - 10:00am
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Eric Osterweil, UCLA

Eric Osterweil is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. His previous experience includes 8 years of industry software engineering, at companies including Micormuse (now owned by IBM) and Avaya. His current research interests center around Internet Security. He is the lead developer on the SecSpider project ( http://secspider.cs.ucla.edu - the first DNSSEC deployment monitoring system).
Abstract: BGP prefix hijacks are a known operational problem in the Internet. In this talk we propose BGP Origins; a system that uses both public data (derived from sources such as RouteViews) to suggest stable prefix-to-origin mappings, and information submitted by users that has been cryptographically signed by a PGP key. This talk will outline the design and usage of this system. Part of the difficulty in developing a prevention technique for prefix hijacking stems from the fact that it is very difficult to determine the rightful origin for an announced prefix (and almost impossible to do so in an automated way). In BGP Origins, users are able to use observed origin information and augment it with their own attestations (of prefix-to-origin mappings). BGP Origins does not require a defacto PKI, and leverages concepts from PGP\'s Web of Trust. End users decide whose attestations they believe. BGP Origins is accessible via DNS\' standard protocol. Users are able to query for origin mappings based on prefixes and can submit their own attestations using DNS updates. BGP Origins is intended to facilitate the operational practice of verifying proper origin mappings and to allow an automated approach for this.
Files: mp4BGP Origins(MP4)
pdfEric Osterweil Presentation(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
BGP Convergence in much less than a second
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 10:00am - 10:20am
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Clarence Filsfils, Cisco Systems

Clarence Filsfils is a Cisco Distinguished Engineer. He has been playing a key role in engineering, marketing and deploying the Quality of Service and Fast Routing Convergence technology at Cisco Systems.
Abstract: It is common to characterize any BGP-related routing convergence as hopelessly slow due to the linear relationship between the number of impacted prefixes (in the 500k range in early 2007 counting internet and vpn routes) and the number of convergence operation (bestpath, RIB and FIB update, transmission or reception of withdraw/update). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that this belief is wrong for any failures occurring within the network of a service provider or on peering links with redundantly-connected peers. This covers the vast majority (if not all) of business models involving BGP convergence requirements. Thanks to BGP Prefix Independent Convergence (BGP PIC), an alternative path to the existing BGP next-hop is enabled at IGP convergence time (modify) in the core scenario, while in the edge scenario, the deletion of the IGP path to a BGP next-hop triggers an immediate and prefix-independent rerouting of the dependent BGP destinations via an alternate BGP next-hop. Aside the obvious convergence gains, BGP PIC and its underlying hierarchical FIB organization bring significant scaling and robustness gains to router architecture. The first section defines the problem and introduces concepts such as RIB, FIB, recursion, dependency, flattened and hierarchical FIB organization. The second section explains why modern high-end router design invests in more complex and expensive packet lookup engine to support hierarchical FIB databases. This allows for significant gains in scaling, robustness and routing convergence (BGP PIC Core). The next section generalizes the hierarchical FIB structure and introduces the concepts of shared BGP path-lists and loadbalancing FIB entries. BGP PIC edge is then defined both for the multipath and unipath BGP policies. The next section describes the BGP control Plane reaction to the core and edge failures, how it is automatically serialized with IGP convergence and how the later BGP control-plane induced FIB modifications reconciliate with the BGP-PIC-modified FIB in a lossless manner. We then review the vast applicability for BGP PIC behavior and report detailed lab measurement based on a commercially-available product. We finish with a conclusion.
Files: mp4BGP Convergence(MP4)
pdfClarence Filsfils Presentation(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Diagnosing the Location of Bogon Filters
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 10:20am - 10:40am
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Randy Bush, IIJ

Randy Bush works as Principal Scientist at Internet Initiative Japan. Previously he spent a bit over a year at AT&T doing research and working on network architecture. He got some operational experience from being on the founding team at Verio, a backbone provider, from which he graduated as VP of Networking after five years. Before that, he was the principal engineer of RAINet, an ISP in Oregon and Washington, which was Verio's first acquisition. As PI for the Network Startup Resource Center, an NSF-supported pro bono effort, he has been involved for some years with the deployment and integration of appropriate networking technology in the developing world.
Abstract: We describe a methodology which targets the identification of wrongly configured route filters by Internet Service Providers (ISPs). A current problem for network operators is that newly announced IP address space (from previously unused IP blocks) is often not reachable as it is still blocked by certain ISPs. It is common for network operators to filter out address space which is known to be unallocated (bogon addresses). However, as allocated address space changes over time these bogons might become legitimately announced prefixes. Unfortunately, some ISPs still do not configure their bogon filters via lists published by the RIRs, instead choosing to manually configure filters. Therefore it would be desirable to test whether filters block IP blocks, before this address space is allocated to ISPs and/or end users. In this article we present a methodology that detects where wrongly configured filters exists, so that ISPs can be contacted and asked to update their filters.
Files: mp4Diagnosing the Location of Bogon Filters(MP4)
pdfRandyBush-BogonFilters(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Stable Internet Route Selection
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 12:10pm - 12:25pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Brighten Godfrey, UC Berkeley

Brighten Godfrey received his B.S. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 2002, and an M.S. from UC Berkeley in 2006. He is now a Ph.D. candidate advised by Ion Stoica at UC Berkeley. His thesis research concerns designing distributed systems for heterogeneity, with a focus on improving stability in interdomain routing and other systems. Other research interests include distributed algorithms, analysis of networks, peer-to-peer systems and overlay networks.
Abstract: Stability is one of the key challenges of BGP, the de facto inter-domain routing protocol in today\'s Internet. BGP\'s slow convergence and recovery in the face of routing failures and policy changes can lead to poor data plane performance including significant periods of packet loss. In this talk, we propose stable route selection (SRS), a simple approach to improve BGP stability, by directly incorporating route stability as a factor in the route selection process. Through extensive simulations in a realistic environment, we show that the mean rate at which routes change can be reduced by a factor of 4.9, while preserving local preferences based on ISP business relationships, and limiting the increase in path length to less than 15%. Moreover, this approach can be deployed easily, as it requires no protocol changes or coordination among ISPs. A single ISP can unilaterally implement SRS and obtain a significant improvement in stability, with benefits increasing as more ISPs participate.
Files: pdfStable Internet Route Selection(PDF)
mp4Stable Internet Route Selection(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
iPlane: An Information Plane for the Internet
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 12:25pm - 12:40pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Harsha V. Madhyastha, University of Washington

Harsha V. Madhyastha is a PhD. candidate in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. His advisors are Prof. Tom Anderson and Prof. Arvind Krishnamurthy at UW, and Prof. Arun Venkataramani at UMass Amherst. His research interests span the areas of networking and distributed systems, with specific enthusiasm in getting his hands dirty with measurements of the Internet and using insights from those to build large-scale systems.
Abstract: We have developed iPlane, an Internet-wide information plane that provides real-time predictions of approximate paths and path properties between arbitrary end-hosts. iPlane continually performs measurements from several hundred geographically distributed vantage points to build a map of the Internet\'s structure and to annotate links in this map with performance metrics such as latency, loss rate, and bandwidth capacity. We have evaluated the utility of iPlane by applying it to several popular distributed services in use today: content distribution, swarming peer-to-peer file-sharing, and voice-over-IP. In each case, using iPlane\'s predictions leads to improved application performance.
Files: pdfiPlane: An Information Plane for the Internet(PDF)
mp4iPlane: An Information Plane for the Internet(MP4)
Sponsors: None.
Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble
Meeting: NANOG40
Date / Time: 2007-06-06 12:40pm - 12:55pm
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington

Ethan Katz-Bassett is pursuing a PhD at the University of Washington. He is advised by Tom Anderson and Arvind Krishnamurthy. His current research is in the area of Internet measurement and measurement-based systems.
Harsha V. Madhyastha, University of Washington.
John P. Johnson, University of Washington.
Arvind Krishnamurthy, University of Washington.
Thomas Anderson, University of Washington.
Abstract: We present Hubble, a system designed to identify and diagnose reachability problems on the Internet in real-time. Using Hubble, we are able to evaluate the extent to which global reachability is violated: how many prefixes are reachable from some vantages and not others, and how long do these problems persist? Whereas previous work focused on either reachability within a single AS or simple passive monitoring of BGP updates, we have designed Hubble to unify RouteViews and distributed vantage points into a system that can perform active probe monitoring and diagnosis of reachability problems to about 90% of the Internet\'s edge prefixes. Our results show that 10% of prefixes experience reachability problems on a given day. Beyond identifying problems, Hubble gathers data and can trigger measurements to help troubleshoot and categorize commonly occuring reachability problems in real-time. Is a prefix currently unreachable from portions of the Internet? Is the problem due to issues with multi-homed failover? Is some AS dropping all traffic to the prefix? Hubble can provide answers to these questions.
Files: pdfReal-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble(PDF)
mp4Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble(MP4)
Sponsors: None.

Back to NANOG40 agenda.

NANOG40 Abstracts

  • Panel: Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G
    Moderators:
    Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications; Panelists:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Drew Perkins, Infinera; Igor Gashinsky, Yahoo!; Lane PattersonEquinix; .
  • Panel: Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G
    Moderators:
    Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications; Panelists:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Drew Perkins, Infinera; Igor Gashinsky, Yahoo!; Lane PattersonEquinix; .
  • Panel: Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G
    Moderators:
    Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications; Panelists:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Drew Perkins, Infinera; Igor Gashinsky, Yahoo!; Lane PattersonEquinix; .
  • Panel: Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G
    Moderators:
    Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications; Panelists:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Drew Perkins, Infinera; Igor Gashinsky, Yahoo!; Lane PattersonEquinix; .
  • Panel: Higher Speed Ethernet - 40G vs 100G
    Moderators:
    Richard A. Steenbergen, nLayer Communications; Panelists:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Drew Perkins, Infinera; Igor Gashinsky, Yahoo!; Lane PattersonEquinix; .
  • ISP Security
    Moderators:
    Danny McPherson, Arbor Networks; Kevin Lanning, AT&T;
  • ISP Security
    Moderators:
    Danny McPherson, Arbor Networks; Kevin Lanning, AT&T;
  • BGP Tools
    Speakers:
    Daniel Massey, Colorado State University;
  • Community Meeting
    Speakers:
    Randy BushActing SC Chair; .
    Steve FeldmanPC Chair; .
    Aleksandr PilosovActing MLC Chair; .
    Betty BurkeNANOG Project Chair at MERIT; .
  • Community Meeting
    Speakers:
    Randy BushActing SC Chair; .
    Steve FeldmanPC Chair; .
    Aleksandr PilosovActing MLC Chair; .
    Betty BurkeNANOG Project Chair at MERIT; .
  • Community Meeting
    Speakers:
    Randy BushActing SC Chair; .
    Steve FeldmanPC Chair; .
    Aleksandr PilosovActing MLC Chair; .
    Betty BurkeNANOG Project Chair at MERIT; .
  • Community Meeting
    Speakers:
    Randy BushActing SC Chair; .
    Steve FeldmanPC Chair; .
    Aleksandr PilosovActing MLC Chair; .
    Betty BurkeNANOG Project Chair at MERIT; .
  • Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble
    Speakers:
    Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington; Harsha V. MadhyasthaUniversity of Washington; .
    John P. JohnsonUniversity of Washington; .
    Arvind KrishnamurthyUniversity of Washington; .
    Thomas AndersonUniversity of Washington; .
  • Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble
    Speakers:
    Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington; Harsha V. MadhyasthaUniversity of Washington; .
    John P. JohnsonUniversity of Washington; .
    Arvind KrishnamurthyUniversity of Washington; .
    Thomas AndersonUniversity of Washington; .
  • Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble
    Speakers:
    Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington; Harsha V. MadhyasthaUniversity of Washington; .
    John P. JohnsonUniversity of Washington; .
    Arvind KrishnamurthyUniversity of Washington; .
    Thomas AndersonUniversity of Washington; .
  • Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble
    Speakers:
    Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington; Harsha V. MadhyasthaUniversity of Washington; .
    John P. JohnsonUniversity of Washington; .
    Arvind KrishnamurthyUniversity of Washington; .
    Thomas AndersonUniversity of Washington; .
  • Real-time Blackhole Analysis with Hubble
    Speakers:
    Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington; Harsha V. MadhyasthaUniversity of Washington; .
    John P. JohnsonUniversity of Washington; .
    Arvind KrishnamurthyUniversity of Washington; .
    Thomas AndersonUniversity of Washington; .

 

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