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NANOG Meeting Presentation Abstract

Tutorial: Introduction to LISP
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-25 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

David Meyer, Cisco Systems/University of Oregon

David Meyer is currently a Director in the Advanced Research and Technologies Group at Cisco Systems, where he works on future directions for Internet technologies. He has been a member of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) of the the IETF (www.ietf.org), and has chaired (or co-chaired) the SPEERMINT, MBONED, MSDP, and DNSOP working groups. He is also a member of several IETF directorates and IRTF research groups. He is also active in the operator community, and was a long standing member of the NANOG program committee. He is also active in other standards organizations such as ANSI T1X1.<BR> <BR> Prior to joining Cisco, he served as Senior Scientist, Chief Technologist and Director of IP Technology Development at Sprint. He is also Director of the Advanced Network Technology Center at the University of Oregon. Prior to working at Sprint, he worked at Cisco, where he was involved in software development, working both on multicast and BGP.

Dino Farinacci, Cisco Systems

Dino has built routers for 26 years. He currently is foucsed on building a next generation Data Center platform. His expertise specializes in routing protocols where he has intimate knowledge and implementation experience with IS-IS, EIGRP, OSPF, BGP, IGMP, PIM, and MSDP, as well as IPv6 and MPLS protocols. He is an advocate for modular operating systems. Dino also has been a member of the IETF for 19 years making many contributions over this period of time. Dino has worked for cisco since early 1991 but was away for 5 years at Procket Networks where he help build the highest speed and most dense router (still to date) in a half rack chassis which ran a fully modular operating system. He has been back at cisco for 3 years where he is currently working on new multicast routing technology such as Multicast Fast-Reroute, AMT, Multicast Virtualization, and layer-2 data-center multicast. Dino is not just a multicast bigot but works on many other protocol and OS initiatives. For example, very recently he is prototyping an idea called LISP to separate an internet address into an ID and Locator to allow the Internet to scale better. Dino currently works in the Data Center Business Unit at cisco where his focus is on building a next-generation platform and operating system for Enterprise and Data Center environments.
Abstract: This tutorial introduces the Locator/ID Seperation Protocol (LISP). After providing a survey of Loc/ID split concepts, the tutorial will explain the LISP data plane (LISP), the LISP control Plane (LISP+ALT), and how LISP sites talk with Non-LISP sites (Interworking). The tutorial will then review the current LISP deployment providing practical examples of how to configure, troubleshoot, and operate a LISP router. The tutorial will wrap up by reviewing an example of how LISP can be configured to<BR> enable (BGP free) active-active multi-homing for end-sites.
Files: pdfDino lisp N45(PDF)
wmvintro to LISP(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: How to Accurately Interpret Traceroute Results
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-25 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Anacaona A
Presenters: Speakers:

Richard Steenbergen, nLayer Communications

Richard Steenbergen is the co-founder of nLayer Communications, a respectably sized and profitable North American based IP backbone, where he currently serves as the Chief Technical Officer. Richard brings years of experience in practical techniques for network operators, and is a frequent contributor in many community forums. Previously, Richard served as a Senior Network Engineer at several large NSPs, and was the Senior Software Engineer responsible for developing optimized routing technologies at netVmg, Inc.<BR> <BR> Richard is also an active developer for tools and software used by the network operator community. Some notable projects include PeeringDB, a portal used by many networks to help coordinate their peering activities, and IRRPT, a software package used by ISPs to maintain IRR-based prefix filters.
Abstract: Many people think they understand how to use and understand traceroute, yet the large number of traceroute based tickets at any sizable ISP proves that the vast majority of people do not. Even the ISPs themselves are frequently unable to come up with staff who are qualified to look at a traceroute and interpret it correctly.
Files: wmvInterpret Traceroutes(WMV)
pdfRAS traceroute N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: Network Operations Practices
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-25 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: Maguana
Presenters: Speakers:

Steve Gibbard, ServePath/GoGrid

Steve Gibbard is the Network Architect at ServePath/GoGrid, a hosting and cloud computing company in San Francisco. Prior to that, his focus had been on network topology for critical DNS services, including designing infrastructure to support several top level domains. He has also done extensive work on Internet peering and exchange points. Steve is a frequent speaker at Internet industry conferences, and writes regularly about issues of Internet infrastructure design and economics. Steve was <BR> previously Network Architect at Packet Clearing House. He is also a former Senior Network Engineer at Cable & Wireless, and has held network engineering positions at Digital Island and World Wide Net.
Abstract: This tutorial covers basic network operations practices, including what to do when a network breaks, how to manage changes and keep a network from breaking, documentation, customer and peer communication, and some very basic network architecture. It does not cover specific router or systems configurations, as there are lots of other tutorials that cover that sort of thing.
Files: pdfGibbard operation practices N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: BGP 102: Scaling the Network
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-25 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Room: Maguana
Presenters: Speakers:

Avi Freedman, Akamai Technologies

Avi Freedman is Chief Network Scientist with Akamai, where he works on architecture, research, product development, Internet visualization, and vulnerability analysis. Prior to joining Akamai, Avi founded Philadelphia's<BR> original ISP, netaxs (4969), and then was VP of Engineering at AboveNet. He was a founding member of the ARIN advisory council and is actively involved in the network community.
Abstract: This talk is aimed at helping a multi-homed network grow from 1 or 2 routers at one POP to a more complex network topology.<BR> <BR> We will cover:<BR> <BR> - BGP Scaling issues in general<BR> - Scalably Originating Routes<BR> - CPU Scaling, Update Load, and Route Table Size<BR> - Loopbacks<BR> - Peer-groups<BR> - Safely (re-)applying policy<BR> - BGP Security<BR> - BGP Features to Avoid: Weight, eBGP Multi-Hop<BR> - iBGP Scaling Issues<BR> - Confederations<BR> - Route Reflectors<BR> - Scalable Route Selection with local-prefs<BR> - Supporting Multi-Homed Customers<BR> - Flexible Policies with BGP Communities<BR> - Handling Disconnected ("Island") POPs<BR> - Sample Network Topology<BR> - Sample Network Router Configurations
Files: pdfFreedman bgp102 1 N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Hijacking and Tools
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-25 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Room: Anacaona A
Presenters: Speakers:

Joel Jaeggli, Nokia

Joel Jaeggli works in the Security and Mobile connectivity group within Nokia. His time is divided between the operation of the nokia.net (AS 14277) research network and supporting the strategic planning needed of Nokia's security business.

Andree Toonk, BCNET

Andree Toonk received his M.Sc. degree in system and network engineering from the University of Amsterdam in 2004 and has several years of<BR> professional experience working for research networks around the world. Andree is currently employed by the University of British Columbia &<BR> BCNET in Vancouver.
Abstract: Andree Toonk - Monitoring your prefixes with BGPmon<BR> <BR> Prefix hijack systems are gaining more interest lately. BGPmon (http://bgpmon.net) is a new prefix hijack detection system offering a range of hijack detection features to its users.<BR> <BR> BGPmon started as a tool for personal professional use and is now a free service for other network administrators. Many of the features are implemented based on discussions or feedback from the nanog email list. These features include support for regular expressions, 4 bytes AS numbers, ASpath irregularities, peer threshold, Bogon detection, flexible per prefix email notification settings as well as several auto detection features to help users with adding prefixes to the system and defining regular expressions for those prefixes.<BR> <BR> Joel Jaeggli - A look at the operator Community's understanding of and response to the route hijacking threat.<BR> <BR> The threat of route hijacking has been present since the inception of inter-domain routing. This talk is intended to provide some history of the understanding of the threat and what can and is being done about it.
Files: pdfJaeggli hijacking detection N45(PDF)
pdfToonk bgpmon N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Welcome Party
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-25 8:00pm - 11:00pm
Room: Offsite
Presenters: Speakers:
Sponsor Dominican Government, through the Dominican Republic, Export & Investment Center (CEI-RD), None.
Abstract: A formal invitation is forthcoming. In the interim, the Dominican government, through the Dominican Republic, Export & Investment Center (CEI-RD), is hosting a welcome party for all NANOG attendees at Columbus Square in the colonial district of Santo Domingo. This venue is surrounded by structures built as early as the 1400's. The national dancers will be performing along with traditional music, food and drink. Buses will leave the NANOG hotel at 7:30pm on Sunday the 25th (the journey is less than 10 minutes). This is something not to be missed! <BR><BR> <B>Transportation for the Dominican Government Cocktail (Sunday 25, 2009) </B> <OL TYPE="I"> <LI> Departure to the Colonial Zone Restaurant: <UL> <LI> Meeting point: Jaragua Hotel Lobby. <BR><BR></LI> <LI> Time: 7:00 p.m. Buses Arrive</LI> <LI> Time: 7:30 p.m. Buses Leave (One ride) <BR><BR></LI> </UL> </LI> <LI> Return to the Jaragua Hotel: <UL> <LI> Meeting point: The parking of the Colonial Zone Restaurant in which the bus leaved the participants. <BR><BR></LI> <LI> Time: 11:00 p.m. Buses Leave (One ride) <BR><BR></LI> </UL> </LI> </OL> Note: In the case that participants don't take these buses, he/she should take public transport (Taxis,etc.). <BR><BR> <TABLE BORDER="0" CELLPADDING="0" CELLSPACING="1"> <TR><TD VALIGN="top" ALIGN="left"> <IMG SRC="/meetings/nanog45/images/invitation.jpg" WIDTH="403" HEIGHT="668" ALT="Inviation"><BR><BR> </TD></TR></TABLE> <BR><BR>
Files: None.
Sponsors: None.
It's The End Of The World As We Know It (aka "The New Internet Architecture")
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 10:30am - 11:00am
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

David Meyer, Cisco Systems/University of Oregon

David Meyer is currently a Director in the Advanced Research and Technologies Group at Cisco Systems, where he works on future directions for Internet technologies. He has been a member of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) of the the IETF (www.ietf.org), and has chaired (or co-chaired) the SPEERMINT, MBONED, MSDP, and DNSOP working groups. He is also a member of several IETF directorates and IRTF research groups. He is also active in the operator community, and was a long standing member of the NANOG program committee. He is also active in other standards organizations such as ANSI T1X1.<BR> <BR> Prior to joining Cisco, he served as Senior Scientist, Chief Technologist and Director of IP Technology Development at Sprint. He is also Director of the Advanced Network Technology Center at the University of Oregon. Prior to working at Sprint, he worked at Cisco, where he was involved in software development, working both on multicast and BGP.
Abstract: This talk surveys (very) recent events in the operation and deployment of IPv4 and IPv6, and what they mean for the "Internet Architecture."
Files: wmvend of the world(WMV)
pdfMeyer iteotwawki N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
BFD - Is it worth it and does it work in production networks?
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Tom Scholl, AT&T Labs

Within the Global IP/MPLS backbone design & development team, his role is to design routing architectures for the core network and work on network integration of the legacy SBC Internet Services network to the AT&T common backbone. Tom has spent his last several years at SBC and Ameritech working in both operations and network engineering roles. He has presented several times at NANOG and always makes time available to help peers and distribute clue where needed.
Abstract: This topic covers the basics of what BFD is and what problems it can solve now as it relates to rapid failure detection. It will also look at where is BFD in terms of actual deployment usage. Input from several operators will be included to give show if BFD is actually helpful or more of a headache when it comes to achieving rapid convergence. The final part of the presentation will highlight future improvements suggested for BFD that can fill in some gaps.
Files: wmvBFDpt1(WMV)
wmvBFDpt2(WMV)
pdfScholl BFD N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Practical Instability Scoring
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 12:00pm - 12:30pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Jim Cowie, Renesys Corporation

Jim Cowie is Chief Technology Officer and cofounder of Renesys Corporation.
Abstract: In this talk, I will briefly review the sources of route instability, describe why modeling and forecasting route instability is difficult, and show how to measure, score, and rank ASNs<BR> according to the patterns of route change intensity exhibited by their integrated customer cone.
Files: pdfCowie final scoring N45(PDF)
wmvpractical instability(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
100Gbps for NexGen Content Distribution Networks
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theatre
Presenters: Speakers:

Martin Zirngibl, Alcatel-Lucent

Martin Zirngibl is currently head of the physical hardware research domain at Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent. Martin joined Bell labs in 1990<BR> after receiving a PHD in applied physics from the Ecole Polytechnique Federal, Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL). At Bell Labs, he worked on<BR> various optical technologies such as fiber amplifiers, photonic integrated circuits and fiber-to-the-home access architectures. He has<BR> won several multi-million dollar DARPA contracts in optical packet switching. More recently he led the research efforts in 100GbE.
Abstract: Video and content distribution will be the main bandwidth driver for access and metropolitan networks forcing network operators to upgrade transport capacity by an order of magnitude over the foreseeable future. To support such a massive build-out, 100Gbps will be required to lower both CAPEX and OPEX while adapting to demands of service domain interconnects. 100Gbps presents some unique challenges because transport technologies that have been used at 10Gbps and 40Gbps cannot be simply scaled to 100Gbps. In this talk, we will review some of the basic technology choices that have to be made for building cost effective, high performance, and reliable 100Gbps transport networks. We will start by reviewing the modulation formats for 100Gbps and discuss their cost and performance related trade-offs. As we will show, a coherent modulation, which is the optical equivalent to a FM car radio, presents the best choice for 100Gbps to have sufficient reach and be compatible with today’s 10Gbps/40Gbps Wavelength Division Multiplexing transmission (WDM) systems. While making 100Gbps affordable, yet without footprint penalty, the industry must adapt a new level of integration. We will show how Photonic Integrated Circuits (PIC) have the potential to achieve our goals. Furthermore, we will discuss the architectural impact of video in conjunction with 100Gbps technology. In particular, we will show an innovative architecture that take advantage of the unique characteristics of video traffic’s asymmetry and bursts.
Files: wmvNextGen Content(WMV)
pdfZirngibl NextGenContent N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Using the Malware Hash Registry
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Stephen Gill, Team Cymru

Stephen Gill is Chief Scientist, Research Fellow, and co-founder of Team Cymru. Stephen has worked as a senior network engineer, security architect, and technical analyst at various companies including IBM, Dantis, GTP,<BR> Vanco, and Cisco Systems. He thrives on innovation, talking tech, and researching the 'who' and 'why'. He equally enjoys worldwide outreach with partners towards solving the technical and social challenges of malicious<BR> Internet activity. He is honored to lead the technical charge for such a forward thinking group of security researchers.
Abstract: Team Cymru will review how to make best use of a new service that has been announced recently dubbed MHR (Malware Hash Registry). The MHR service allows you to query our database of many millions of unique malware samples for a computed MD5 or SHA-1 hash of a file. If it is malware and we know about it, we return the last time we've seen it along with an approximate anti-virus detection percentage.<BR> <BR> Upon submission of a malware hash, the output of the command will return a date the sample was first seen as well as the detection rate we've seen using up to 30 AV packages. The detection rate is based on the first time we scanned the sample.<BR> <BR> The MHR compliments an anti-virus (AV) strategy by helping to identify unknown or suspicious files that we have already identified as malicious. This enables you to take action earlier than you would otherwise be able to. We also present a client side toolkit to complement your standard AV packages using this system.
Files: pdfGill malware N45(PDF)
wmvMalware hash(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
DNSSEC
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Kevin Oberman, ESnet

R. Kevin Oberman is a Senior Engineer for Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at Ernest O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).<BR> <BR> 1995 to present: Senior Engineer, ESnet<BR> 1985 to 1995: Network Manager, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Engineering Department<BR> 1980 to 1985: System Analyst, Engineering Research Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory<BR> 1977 to 1980: Systems Programmer, Engineering Research Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory<BR> 2004 to present: Member of the Program Committee for Joint Techs, ESnet/Internet2

Chris Griffiths, Comcast Cable

Chris is currently the Principal Engineer for Domain Name Services and Network Management within the Product Engineering team at Comcast. He is currently responsible for architecting and deploying solutions to support Comcast's High Speed Data, Voice over IP, and Video networks.<BR> Prior to joining the Product Engineering team, Chris lead the Production Support team in Systems Engineering at Comcast. His primary focus was leading a team of Engineers that supported DNS, DHCP, Back Office Provisioning and IPv6 related development and deployment activities.
Abstract: The presentation will cover experiences and lessons learned during the test bed configuration and deployment which include signing of zones, distribution of Comcast public keys, the search for available public keys and keeping keys current. The presentation will also cover the flavors of test resolvers and how they performed with DNSSEC under load.
Files: pdfGriffiths DNSSEC Comcastv5 N45(PDF)
pdfOberman DNSSEC Implem N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: Peering 101
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Kevin Oberman, ESnet

R. Kevin Oberman is a Senior Engineer for Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at Ernest O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).<BR> <BR> 1995 to present: Senior Engineer, ESnet<BR> 1985 to 1995: Network Manager, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Engineering Department<BR> 1980 to 1985: System Analyst, Engineering Research Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory<BR> 1977 to 1980: Systems Programmer, Engineering Research Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory<BR> 2004 to present: Member of the Program Committee for Joint Techs, ESnet/Internet2

William B. Norton, InterStream

Bill Norton is a consultant for InterStream, an industry association focused on the delivery of high quality streams. Prior to that he was Co-Founder and Chief Technical Liaison for Equinix, Inc., a global provider of Internet Exchange and colocation services. Bill worked at Merit Network for eleven years where he developed the first business plan for the North American Network Operators Group (NANOG) and chaired NANOG from 1995-1998.
Abstract: Peering has evolved from being a routing optimization to a strategic intent. As traffic volume grows, peering becomes more interesting from both a performance and cost savings perspective. This 90 minute tutorial will introduce the terms, the motivations, the processes and the math behind Internet interconnection.
Files: pdfNorton Peering101 v0 N45(PDF)
wmvPeerin 101 continued(WMV)
wmvPeerin 101 continued(WMV)
wmvPering101 pt1(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
ISP Security
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room: Anacaona A
Presenters: Speakers:
Eric Jackson, Arbor Networks.

Warren Kumari, Google

Warren Kumari is a Senior Network Engineer at Google, where he has been for the past 4 years. He has over 15 years experience in the Internet industry. During that time, Warren has worked for a wide range of companies, ranging from tiny start-up ISPs to large enterprises. Prior to Google, he was at AOL and before that at Register.com, back when competitive registrars were first introduced.<BR> <BR> He is active in the IETF and serves on the ICANN Security and Stability Advisory Committee.
Abstract: Security incidents are a daily event for Internet Service Providers. Attacks on an ISP's customers, attacks from an ISP's customer, worms, BOTNETs, and attacks on the ISP's infrastructure are now one of many "security" NOC events throughout the day. The continued increase in the volume and intensity of attacks has forced ISP's to expend constrained resources to mitigate the effects of these attacks on their operations and services. This investment has helped minimize the effects of the attacks, but it has not helped stop them at the source. Stopping attacks at their source requires rapid and effective inter-ISP cooperation. Hence, these ISP Security BOFs are also used as a face-to- face sync up meeting for the ISP Security Operations community.
Files: None.
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: Effective BGP Load Balancing Using "The Metric System"
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-26 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room: Maguana
Presenters: Speakers:

Dani Roisman, Peak Web Consulting

Dani Roisman provides Network Design and Engineering services at Peak Web Consulting. In addition to his role as a Senior Network Architect, he is also the Engineering Team Lead for Southern California. He specializes in large content datacenters and networks, with a focus on peering and multi-homing to reduce costs, improve customer negotiating stance, as well as increased network capacity, performance, and fault-tolerance. His network design and implementation accomplishments include multiplayer game and social networking deployments hosting over 5,000 servers across 9 datacenters with Internet bandwidth capacities reaching 250Gbps.
Abstract: Presenting real-world experiences of effective outbound load-balancing across multiple ISPs using BGP traffic engineering and what we call "the metric system." Primary audience is content or data hosting networks that connect to multiple ISPs. Focus is on actual techniques that have been used successfully in numerous installations for simple, effective, and reliable load balancing. This tutorial will show in-depth and specific configurations to achieve desired traffic engineering and will share real-world results.
Files: wmvEffective BGP load(WMV)
pdfRoisman bgp metric N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Practical Reverse Traceroute
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 9:30am - 10:00am
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Ethan Katz-Bassett, University of Washington

Ethan Katz-Bassett is pursuing a PhD at the University of Washington and expects to graduate in a year.  His dissertation work is on building measurement-based Internet monitoring systems.  He is advised by Tom Anderson and Arvind Krishnamurthy.    
Abstract: Traceroute is the most widely used Internet diagnostic tool today.  It is used to help identify routing failures, path inflation, and router misconfigurations.  Researchers use it to map the Internet, predict performance, geolocate routers, and classify the performance of ISPs. However, traceroute has long had a fundamental limitation that affects all these applications: it does not provide the reverse path back from the destination to the source.  Although various public traceroute servers across the Internet provide some visibility, no general method exists for determining a reverse path from an arbitrary destination, without control of that destination.<BR> <BR> In recent work, we address this long standing limitation by building a reverse traceroute tool.  Our tool provides the same information as traceroute, but for the reverse path, and it works in the same case as traceroute, when the user may lack control of the destination.  Our approach combines a number of ideas: source spoofing, IP timestamp and record route options, and multiple vantage points.  We have deployed our system on PlanetLab. In the median case our tool returns 87% of the hops seen by a traceroute of the same path.  We use our reverse traceroute system to study previously unmeasurable aspects of the Internet, and I will present a case study of how a content provider could use our tool to troubleshoot poor performance.
Files: pdfKatz reversetraceroute N45(PDF)
wmvreverse traceroute(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
IPv6 Traffic Levels on Hurricane Electric's Backbone
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 10:00am - 10:30am
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Martin Levy, Hurricane Electric

Martin Levy has been involved in the TCP/IP world since its inception. Originally from London, England, Martin came to the US to work as a software developer at Bell Labs where he ran the first TCP/IP network-enabled UNIX computers. After seven years in New Jersey, Martin joined the Silicon Valley entrepreneurial-life and continued his focus on networking software. When the ISP industry started to take root in the early 90's, it was a natural industry to move into. Since then Martin has been building networks in California, the US, Europe and Latin America. Since joining Hurricane<BR> Electric in 2008, Martin has taken on the role of significantly expanding the IPv6 commercial offerings from Hurricane Electric.
Abstract: IPv6 traffic levels have been the subject of discussions and reports at various networking conferences. Alas none of these previous talks have addressed real traffic levels within an operational global IPv6 backbone. This talk reviews IPv6 traffic levels within the Hurricane Electric backbone; shows where IPv6 peering works (and doesn’t work). The data is being collected throughout the backbone and will be presented in this talk.<BR> <BR> But does traffic measurements matter? Is that the most important measurement we have on backbones? Maybe it’s less quantitative and more qualitative. IPv6 readiness is maybe more important than the traffic levels. This talk will compare the importance of IPv6 traffic levels and IPv6 readiness. <BR> <BR> The inclusion of IPv6 packets within the traffic mix may well be coming from the same applications and could just be a substitute for existing IPv4 packets; vs. created via new applications. At the backbone level; the talk describes why it’s more important to be ready for any traffic, immaterial of IPv6 or IPv4 protocol choice.
Files: wmvIPv6 hurricane(WMV)
pdfLevy traffic level hurricane N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
BMP, The BGP Monitoring Protocol
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 10:30am - 11:00am
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

John Scudder, Juniper Networks

John Scudder has been sporadically attending and presenting at NANOG since 1990 when it was called Regional Techs, first as a network operator, then a consultant, and now as a vendor. He is currently a Distinguished Engineer at Juniper Networks. Prior to Juniper, John worked at Cisco Systems, Internet Engineering Group (IEng) where he was co-founder, Ameritech Advanced Data Systems, and at Merit Network as part of the NSFNET project. John co-chairs the IETF's Routing Area Working Group and is a frequent contributor to the IDR working group. John's other interests include scuba diving and bread baking.
Rex Fernando, Juniper Networks.
Abstract: The BGP Monitoring Protocol, BMP, was recently proposed in the IETF GROW working group. BMP is intended to provide a more convenient interface for obtaining route views than the screen-scraping approach in common use today. The design goals are to keep BMP simple, useful, easily implemented, and minimally service-affecting.<BR> <BR> The talk will describe BMP, discuss how it can be used, and solicit feedback from network operators.
Files: wmvbmp the bgp protocol(WMV)
pdfScudder bmp N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
4-byte ASNs
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks

Greg Hankins is Director, Technical Marketing for Force10 Networks. He is responsible for working with ISPs and IXs around the world as a consulting engineer and product evangelist.
Chris Malayter, Switch and Data.
Abstract: - Intro, what are 4-byte ASNs<BR> - Recent developments (ASPLAIN notation, etc)<BR> - What all will change, why do I see ASN 23456, how many 4-byte ASNs are out there now<BR> - Status update on ARIN policy, what is happening, this is why it is important<BR> - Routing software code status (vendor and free), what version supports it<BR> - Tools/LG status<BR> - Call to action that you need to start paying attention and fix your stuff
Files: wmv4byteASNs(WMV)
pdfHankins 4byteASN N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Haitian Internet Exchange Point: A Difficult Dream
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:
Reynold Guerrier, Multilink SA.
Abstract: A review of the history and challenges associated with attempts to create an exchange point in Haiti. Since 1999 we started talks about setting up an Internet Exchange Point in Haiti to keep local traffic local. 10 years later we are unable to make it happen however all the stakeholders are convinced of the well being of an IXP.
Files: pdfGuerrier AHTIC EXCCHANGE POINT N45(PDF)
wmvHatian Internet(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
Internet Captivity and De-peering
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Martin A. Brown, Renesys Corporation

Martin has been working with IP networking under Linux for more than ten years. As part of the Renesys development team, he works in BGP data analysis. His expertise involves OSS development in systems integration and infrastructure particularly in networking contexts. <BR> Former work has involved network security, firewalls, virtual private networks, quality of service and managing and scaling distributed systems. He holds an M.A. in German from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Clint Hepner, Renesys Corporation

Clint Hepner is a member of the engineering team at Renesys, where he focuses<BR> on Interent mapping and event detection. He graduated from Dartmouth College<BR> in 2005 with a M.S. in Computer Science.

Alin Popescu, Renesys Corporation

Alin Popescu is a member of the engineering team at Renesys. His specialties include implementing statistical and learning algorithms and developing system architectures for BGP data analysis. Before joining Renesys, Alin earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Dartmouth College.
Abstract: De-peering events are bad, but when the combatants involved are transit-free networks, they can be catastrophic to captive customers. Such events break the promise of One Internet by preventing single-homed prefixes in each of the de-peered parties' transit cones from exchanging traffic with each other.<BR> <BR> A recent de-peering event illustrated the perfect storm scenario: two transit-free networks--Sprint (AS 1239) and Cogent (AS 174)--de-peered, partitioning the Internet in the process. We will present an analysis of this particular event: timeline, geographic scope, winners and losers.<BR> <BR> This event emphasizes the risk of being dependent (transitively single-homed) on a single AS for Internet connectivity. We will take a look at some of the biggest networks and quantify the exposure of their transitive customers to Internet partition events.
Files: pdfBrown Internet Peering N45(PDF)
wmvinternet captivity(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: Small Network Operator - Lessons Learned
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room: Anacaona A
Presenters: Speakers:

Pete Templin, TexLink

Pete Templin is an IP Engineer at TexLink Communications, now a Pac-West Telecomm Company. Pete now keeps several networks running smoothly, in anticipation of lots of integration projects, and assists with product development and other VoIP engineering tasks.
Abstract: This presentation is targeted at operators of networks of one to several routers, perhaps up to several POPs, and presents key operational concepts that have made a difference in the reliability and scalability of a small-medium network. Content has been updated and refined since the NANOG42 presentation.
Files: wmvSmall network op(WMV)
pdfTemplin lessonslearned N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Peering
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Aaron Hughes, Cariden Technologies, LMCO, UnitedLayer

Aaron Hughes is currently in the Network Architecture and Design group at Lockheed Martin on the TMOS/TSAT project through a contract with Cariden Technologies Inc as the FSO. He is also the VP of Operations at UnitedLayer bringing more than 15 years of experience in the telecommunications industry and is responsible for network topology planning, design and operations. <BR> <BR> Aaron has also held network and system architecture roles at Terremark, Certainty Solutions, Quest Technologies, RCN, UltraNet and Channel(1) Communications.
Abstract: Intro - Aaron Hughes, Cariden<BR> <BR> Assess the room (content, eyeballs, DR region) - Aaron Hughes<BR> <BR> Legal challenges with off shore content, the high cost of Caribbean transit (~$800/M) and the issues surrounding back-hauling to Miami, FL. Open dialogue (based on above assessment)<BR> <BR> Peering DB updates / intro peering tool - Richard Steenbergen / Aaron Hughes<BR> <BR> IX Update - IX Operators<BR> <BR> IPv6 Deployment in Internet Exchange Points - Roque Gagliano<BR> <BR> Peering personals<BR> - 4-byte ASN peering Greg Hankins<BR> - Panther Express - Monica O'Meany<BR> - InterNAP - Stacy Hughes<BR> - Audience<BR> <BR> Survey Results - Peter Cohen
Files: None.
Sponsors: None.
Tutorial: Introduction to DHCPv6 and DHCPv6 on DOCSIS
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-27 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room: Maguana
Presenters: Speakers:

John Jason Brzozowski, Comcast Cable

At Comcast, John provides technical leadership and guides the firm's deployment of IPv6. He leverages his expertise and experiences to drive the adoption and implementation of IPv6 ensuring that innovative solutions are in place to support traditional and next generation services. John has contributed significantly to many standards and technologies critical to the cable industry's adoption of IPv6, specifically those pertaining to voice, video, and data. He works closely with CableLabs on DOCSIS and PacketCable specifications and has contributed to IETF standards efforts.<BR> <BR> John's work in the technical community currently includes acting as the chair of the MidAtlantic IPv6 Task Force, North American IPv6 Task Force Steering Committee member, and member of the IPv6 Forum. Through his work with these organization he helps to drive and support critical IPv6 activities regionally and nationally including but not limited to promoting IPv6 education, awareness, and of course adoption. John also serves as co-chair of the IETF DHC Working Group and co-chair of the MAAWG IPv6 technical sub-committee.
Abstract: This session is intended to provide an introduction to DHCPv6. DHCPv6 will be compared and contrast to DHCPv4 specific topics including redundancy will be discussed. Additional topics related to the evolution and future use of<BR> DHCPv6 will also be discussed. Information about current applications of DHCPv6 will also be discussed specifically the use of DHCPv6 in DOCSIS networks. Deployment and migration techniques will also be discussed at a<BR> high level.
Files: pdfBrzozow dhcpv6 v7 N45(PDF)
wmvDHCPv6(WMV)
Sponsors: None.
LACNIC - Challenges Faced in the Organization and Region
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-28 9:30am - 10:00am
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Ricardo Patara, LACNIC

Ricardo Patara is currently in charge of the technical area of LACNIC, which includes registration service, engineering and IT.<BR> Before that he works for an academic network taking care of routing and interconnection issues.
Erick Iriarte Ahon, General Manager, LACTLD.
Abstract: The presentation show a brief history about LACNIC formation, which was a challenge. And some highlights about the current challenges we are seeing in the region and how we are helping to address them.
Files: wmvLACNIC(WMV)
pdfPatara lacnic N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
Summer V6cation
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-28 10:30am - 11:00am
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Pete Templin, TexLink

Pete Templin is an IP Engineer at TexLink Communications, now a Pac-West Telecomm Company. Pete now keeps several networks running smoothly, in anticipation of lots of integration projects, and assists with product development and other VoIP engineering tasks.
Abstract: This talk covers the planning and execution of our IPv6 rollout across a four-POP network. It's intended to offer a baseline for other operators looking to conduct a similar exercise, helping to provide a catalyst for the steps and sequence necessary.
Files: wmvSummer V6cation(WMV)
pdfTemplin SummerV6cation N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.
A Comparative Analysis of BGP Anomaly Detection and Robustness Algorithms
Meeting: NANOG45
Date / Time: 2009-01-28 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room: La Fiesta Theater
Presenters: Speakers:

Kotikapaludi Sriram, NIST

Kotikalapudi Sriram received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, India, and a Ph.D. degree from Syracuse University, all in electrical engineering. He is currently a Senior Researcher in the Advanced Networking Technologies Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD. Previously, he held various positions at Bell Laboratories - the innovations arm of Alcatel-Lucent and formerly that of AT&T. His titles at Bell Laboratories included Consulting Member of Technical Staff (approximately top 1% of engineers in 2001) and Distinguished Member of Technical Staff. His current research interests include Inter-domain Routing architecture and security, and seamless mobility in wireless access networks. He is a contributing author and a coeditor of Cable Modems: Current Technologies and Applications (IEEE Press, 1999). He holds 17 U.S. patents. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.
Patrick Gleichmann, NIST.
Doug Montgomery, NIST.
Okee Kim, NIST.
Oliver Borchert, NIST.
Abstract: We present an evaluation methodology for comparison of existing and proposed new algorithms for Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) anomaly detection and robustness. A variety of algorithms and alert tools have been proposed and/or prototyped recently. They differ in the anomaly situations which they attempt to alert or mitigate, and also in the type(s) of data they use. Some are based on registry data from Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) and Internet Routing Registries (IRRs), e.g., the Nemecis tool. Others such as the Prefix Hijack Alert System (PHAS) and the Pretty Good BGP (PGBGP) are driven by BGP trace data. The trace data is obtained from RIPE-RIS, Routeviews, or a BGP speaker where the algorithm operates. We propose a new algorithm that combines the use of both registry and trace data, and also makes some key improvements over existing algorithms. We have built an evaluation platform called TERRAIN (Testing and Evaluation of Routing Robustness in Assurable Inter-domain Networking) on which these algorithms can be tested and empirically compared based on real and/or synthetic anomalies in BGP messages. We will present a variety of results providing interesting insights into the comparative utility and performance of the various BGP robustness algorithms. Our objective is to share these early insights and invite feedback from the community to refine the TERRAIN evaluation framework and direct future analysis.
Files: wmvAnalysis BGP(WMV)
pdfSriram BGP Robust N45(PDF)
Sponsors: None.

Back to NANOG45 agenda.

NANOG45 Abstracts

  • Introduction to LISP
    Speakers:
    David Meyer, Cisco Systems/University of Oregon; Dino Farinacci, Cisco Systems;
  • Introduction to LISP
    Speakers:
    David Meyer, Cisco Systems/University of Oregon; Dino Farinacci, Cisco Systems;
  • Welcome Party
    Speakers:
    Sponsor Dominican Government, through the Dominican Republic, Export & Investment Center (CEI-RD)None; .
  • DNSSEC
    Speakers:
    Kevin Oberman, ESnet; Chris Griffiths, Comcast Cable;
  • DNSSEC
    Speakers:
    Kevin Oberman, ESnet; Chris Griffiths, Comcast Cable;
  • Peering 101
    Speakers:
    Kevin Oberman, ESnet; William B. Norton, InterStream;
  • Peering 101
    Speakers:
    Kevin Oberman, ESnet; William B. Norton, InterStream;
  • ISP Security
    Speakers:
    Eric JacksonArbor Networks; .
    Warren Kumari, Google;
  • ISP Security
    Speakers:
    Eric JacksonArbor Networks; .
    Warren Kumari, Google;
  • 4-byte ASNs
    Speakers:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Chris MalayterSwitch and Data; .
  • 4-byte ASNs
    Speakers:
    Greg Hankins, Force10 Networks; Chris MalayterSwitch and Data; .
  • Peering
    Speakers:
    Aaron Hughes, Cariden Technologies, LMCO, UnitedLayer;

 

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