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NANOG Meeting Presentation Abstract

Evolution of the U.S. Peering Ecosystem
Meeting: NANOG31
Date / Time: 2004-05-25 9:30am - 10:00am
Room: Grand Ballroom
Presenters: Speakers:

Bill Norton, Equinix

William B. Norton has held the position of Co-Founder and Chief Technical Liaison for Equinix for the past six years, focusing on Internet research relating to peering and interconnections. Many of his white papers are publicly available and currently in use in college curricula around the globe.
Abstract: A new Internet peering ecosystem is rising from the ashes of the 1999/2000 U.S. telecommunications sector crash. Global Internet transit providers have gone bust and a critical broadband infrastructure provider has failed, leaving in its wake a large set of Internet players to fend for themselves to provide their customers with Internet services. A broad set of service providers that were once focused only on growing their market share (at any cost) now are bending down to shave pennies off of their cost structure. Those who cannot prove the viability of their business model while satisfying their customer demands are out of business.

In this presentation, we share research carried out over the last four years with hundreds of Peering Coordinators to document the recent chaotic evolution of the peering ecosystem. We do this by first defining the notion of an \"Internet Peering Ecosystem\" as a set of autonomous Internet Regions, each with three distinct categories of participants. Each of these groups of participants has their own sets of characteristics, motivations and corresponding behaviors and interconnection dynamics. We describe four classes of Peering Inclinations as articulated in Peering Policies.

The bulk of the presentation, however, focuses on the evolution of the U.S. Peering Ecosystem. Several key players, some abandoned by their service providers, have entered into the Peering Ecosystem and caused a significant disruption to the ecosystem. Peer-to-peer application traffic has grown to represent a significant portion of their expense. We describe five major events and three emerging evolutions in the Peering Ecosystem that have had, and continue to have, a significant disintermediation effect on Tier 1 ISPs.
Files: youtubeEvolution of the U.S. Peering Ecosystem
pdfWilliam Norton - Peering Ecosystem paper(PDF)
pdfWilliam Norton Slides(PDF)
Sponsors: None.

Back to NANOG31 agenda.

NANOG31 Abstracts

  • Happy Packets - Initial Results
    Speakers:
    Randy Bush, IIJ; Tim GriffinIntel Research; .
    Zhuoqing MaoUniversity of Michigan; .
    Eric PurpusUniversity of Oregon; .
    Dan StutzbachUniversity of Oregon; .
  • Happy Packets - Initial Results
    Speakers:
    Randy Bush, IIJ; Tim GriffinIntel Research; .
    Zhuoqing MaoUniversity of Michigan; .
    Eric PurpusUniversity of Oregon; .
    Dan StutzbachUniversity of Oregon; .
  • Happy Packets - Initial Results
    Speakers:
    Randy Bush, IIJ; Tim GriffinIntel Research; .
    Zhuoqing MaoUniversity of Michigan; .
    Eric PurpusUniversity of Oregon; .
    Dan StutzbachUniversity of Oregon; .
  • Happy Packets - Initial Results
    Speakers:
    Randy Bush, IIJ; Tim GriffinIntel Research; .
    Zhuoqing MaoUniversity of Michigan; .
    Eric PurpusUniversity of Oregon; .
    Dan StutzbachUniversity of Oregon; .
  • Happy Packets - Initial Results
    Speakers:
    Randy Bush, IIJ; Tim GriffinIntel Research; .
    Zhuoqing MaoUniversity of Michigan; .
    Eric PurpusUniversity of Oregon; .
    Dan StutzbachUniversity of Oregon; .

 

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