Agenda

NANOG 79 Virtual Meeting agenda

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Monday, June 1, 2020
Time Location Topic
12:00 - 12:15
Full Abstract

Welcome to NANOG 79 - Virtual!

Speakers
  • Speaker L Sean Kennedy
  • Vincent Celindro, Juniper Networks
12:15 - 12:45
Full Abstract

In this talk, we present data showing the impact of COVID-19 lockdowns on a broad cross-section of NA, EU, LATAM and Asia providers. Our talk includes anonymized traffic and application usage data from several hundred million subscribers across more than 50 collaborating providers. We show unprecedented growth in peak traffic volumes of 30% or more over one week in April followed by a plateau in peak volumes over the remainder of the month. The COVID-19 lockdown related traffic increases include a significant growth in gaming, videoconferencing and a 40% growth in DDoS traffic volumes. Overall, we show network capacity and QoE remained largely sufficient for managing the increased load based on analysis of peer / CDN capacity and a longitudinal study of per subscriber video streaming rates.

Speakers
  • Speaker Craig Labovitz
12:45 - 13:30
Full Abstract

CDNs, ISPs, and cloud providers have all encountered challenges in the time of Covid-19. We’ll discuss how each of our panelists have dealt with performance, capacity, supply chain, and other issues during this period of unforecasted growth.

Moderated by Samuel Burke, Technology Correspondent, CNN Philippines

Panelists: Dave Temkin, Vice President of Network and Systems Infrastructure at Netflix; Rob Rockell, Vice President of Network Engineering at Comcast; Graham Kinsey, Manager of Edge Network Capacity and Operations at Google.

Speakers
  • Moderator Samuel Burke, CNN Philippines
  • Panelist Graham Kinsey, Google
  • Robert Rockell, Comcast
  • David Temkin, Netflix
13:30 - 14:00
Full Abstract

Scale-out design, when applied to routing, directs us to build large fabrics of routers. This has limitations due to control plane scaling. These limitations can be addressed through the use of Dynamic Flooding, which allows traditional IGPs to scale more smoothly than has been possible in the past.

Sarah Chen: Sarah is a software engineer at Arista Networks, currently working on the supernode architecture.
Speakers
  • Speaker Sarah Chen
14:00 - 15:00
Full Abstract

Are you a Newcomer to NANOG? Would you like to network with other Newcomers and NANOG veterans? Join us for the Zoom Session!
NANOG is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: NANOG 79 Newcomers
Time: Jun 1, 2020 14:00 Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
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Meeting ID: 972 2996 4700
Password: 576514
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15:00 - 15:30
Full Abstract

Transnational Internet performance is an important indication of a country’s level of infrastructure investment, globalization, and openness. We conduct a large-scale measurement study of transnational Internet performance in and out of 29 countries and regions, and find six countries that have surprisingly low performance. Five of them are African countries and the last is mainland China, a significant outlier with major discrepancies between downstream and upstream performance. We then conduct a comprehensive investigation of the unusual transnational Internet performance of mainland China, which we refer to as the “Great Bottleneck of China”. Our results show that this bottleneck is widespread, affect- ing 79% of the receiver–sender pairs we measured. More than 70% of the pairs suffer from extremely slow speed (less than 1 Mbps) for more than 5 hours every day. In most tests the bottleneck appeared to be located deep inside China, suggesting poor network infrastructure to handle transnational traffic. The phenomenon has far-reaching implications for Chinese users’ browsing habits as well as for the ability of foreign Internet services to reach Chinese customers.

Speakers
  • Speaker Pengxiong Zhu
15:30 - 16:00
Full Abstract

Join us in a throwback to the time Geoff Huston presented at NANOG 68!

Is "default" the same all over the Internet? Does every component network in the Internet see the same of routes, or are there routes that are only visible to a subset of the Internet? This presentation analyses the route sets advertised to a number of the route collection points and looks for differences in the various route sets to see where and how "default" differs between networks.

Geoff Huston: Geoff Huston is the Chief Scientist at APNIC, the Regional Internet Registry for the Asia Pacific. Prior to this role he was the Chief Internet Architect at Telstra in Australia. He has served on the Internet Architecture Board and chaired a number of IETF Working Groups. His current research interests include routing, security and the DNS.
Speakers
  • Speaker Geoff Huston, APNIC
16:00 - 16:30
Full Abstract

In the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), prepending is a technique used to de-prioritize a route by artificially increasing the length of the AS_PATH attribute by repeating an autonomous system number (ASN). Unfortunately, as this talk will show, prepending is frequently employed in an excessive manner such that it renders routes vulnerable to disruption or misdirection – accidental or otherwise.

In a “prepended-to-all” configuration, prepending exists on every transit path for a prefix. In this configuration, the prepending is no longer shaping route propagation. It is simply incentivizing ASes to choose another origin if one were to suddenly appear whether by mistake or otherwise. So how many prefixes in the global routing table are prepended-to-all? The number might surprise you.

Speakers
  • Speaker Doug Madory, Oracle
16:30 - 17:00
Full Abstract

An update on ARIN's new IRR presented by John Curran, ARIN's President and CEO

Speakers
  • Speaker John Curran, ARIN
Tuesday, June 2, 2020
Time Location Topic
12:00 - 12:30
Full Abstract

Becoming Disconnected: A pragmatic look at the evolution of application delivery based on the progression of underlying transport from telephone switchboards to today’s 400G ethernet

Speakers
  • Speaker Tom Daly, Fastly, Advisor
12:30 - 13:15
Full Abstract

The Open Source Network Operating system landscape changed over the last few years and has been gaining increased adoption at hyper-scalers, service providers and large enterprises. In this talk I attempt to simplify what really makes up a network operating system at a high level, highlight and provide an overview of some of the prominent open networking operating systems, components and tools that are out there now and in the works, their current state, features supported, use cases where these can be deployed and what's next.

Open Networking Linux - OpenSwitch - SONiC - Stratum - FlexSwitch - FBOSS - Danos - DENT

Senthil Kumar Ganesan: Senthil Kumar Ganesan is from Dell Technologies working as a Distinguished MTS. Senthil has specialized in the field of Networking OS Development for 15+ years and has led many network stack development for various OS. He has contributed various open source projects such as Open Switch, SONiC, SAI, Ansible etc. Avid learner & Tamil Movie Buff.
Speakers
  • Speaker Senthil Kumar Ganesan, Dell Technologies
13:15 - 14:00
Full Abstract

Akamai is leading a standards-based open access approach to interdomain multicast. We're now at the stage of seeking partners to help us validate and refine the architecture, to make sure it will work well for operators. This talk covers our motivations in pursuing multicast IP, a brief overview of the key pieces of the proposed architecture, and invites participation to operators who would like to join us in making it happen.

Jake Holland: Jake is a Principal Architect at Akamai. He has been a software engineer focused on networking for over 20 years, and has been an active participant in the IETF for the last 3 years.
Speakers
  • Speaker Jake Holland
14:00 - 15:00
Full Abstract

Would you like to participate in the WIT Networking Session at NANOG 79? Join us for the Zoom Session!

NANOG is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: WIT Networking
Time: Jun 2, 2020 14:00 Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
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Meeting ID: 941 4345 4202
Password: 908515
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15:00 - 16:00
Recordings
Full Abstract

The “whiteboard talk” represents one of the key ways that engineers can communicate ideas in a concise and educational way to colleagues. More than a classroom lecture or a slide presentation, a whiteboard talk is a combination of several disciplines including teaching, storytelling, the visual display of information, and improvisational acting.

In this tutorial, the attendees will learn how to organize a whiteboard discussion, how to avoid popular pitfalls, and how to make sure that their audience walks away with the knowledge that the attendee wants them to have. These topics include how to narrow down the scope of a topic (both in terms of the topic itself and the level of abstraction), how to build the knowledge model for the talk, how to define terms for different audiences, and how to handle difficult audience members.

Speakers
  • Speaker Matt Ringel, Akamai Technologies
16:00 - 16:35
Full Abstract

This presentation looks at IPv6 adoption over Internet Exchanges. It looks at IPv6 peering availability on Internet exchanges globally and how IPv6 looks on the exchanges compared to the Internet in general. Because Hurricane Electric is present at over 230 exchanges, we are in a unique position to see this data and share it with the community. The presentation includes detailed graphs of IPv6 peering on individual exchanges and looks at how exchanges are influencing IPv6 adoption.

Susan Forney: Susan Forney is a network engineer at Hurricane Electric Internet Services, which operates the largest IPv6 backbone in the world in terms of number of connected networks. Before joining Hurricane Electric, she was the principal network engineer at the Markley Group, where she developed and operated the Boston Internet Exchange. She was a principal network engineer and architect at at the Microsoft Corporation for 15 years, and also worked as a network engineer at Starbucks and the Boeing Company. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the North American Network Operators Group (NANOG).
Speakers
  • Speaker Susan Forney, Hurricane Electric
16:35 - 17:00
Full Abstract

The United States Government Office of Management and Budget recently announced a memo that directed all agencies to plan for at least 80% of IP-enabled assets on Federal networks to be IPv6-only by the end of FY 2025. This is the first of what will mostly likely be several announcements about network operators moving to IPv6-only networks. As we move to IPv6-only networks operators are looking for ways to help with the transition customers. The IETF has documented several different protocols for this transition which includes MAP-E, MAP-T, DS-Lite, LW4over6, and 464XLAT. These protocols allow for network operators to roll out IPv6-only networks in pieces instead of all at once.

When deploying new protocols into the network, operators need to ensure that devices can interoperate. Developers of the products need to ensure the network devices they are developing meet the requirements of the standards and the network operators.
Both network operators and developers need testing to ensure transitioning to IPv6 networks will have a low impact on the users. Current testing for both Interoperability and Conformance has shown common issues that the community can learn from including fragmentation, configuration, and protocol complexity that can be avoided. This presentation will present the lessons learned during testing of IPv6-only transition technologies.

Speakers
  • Speaker Timothy Winters, QA Cafe
Wednesday, June 3, 2020
Time Location Topic
12:00 - 12:30
Full Abstract

This talk will explore some of the many times that the Internet has been declared dead, claimed to be useless or about to be replaced by some other network that will meet our every need. Needless to say, the Internet has not been replaced
and has survived all these “deaths”. Examining these cases can teach us something about how non-netheads view the Internet and give us a heads up on what might be on the horizon and coming this way.

Scott Bradner: Scott Bradner was involved in the design, operation and use of data networks at Harvard University since the early days of the ARPANET. He was involved in the design of the original Harvard data networks, the Longwood Medical Area network (LMAnet) and New England Academic and Research Network (NEARnet). He was founding chair of the technical committees of LMAnet, NEARnet and the Corporation for Research and Enterprise Network (CoREN). Mr. Bradner served in a number of roles in the IETF. He was the co-director of the Operational Requirements Area (1993-1997), IPng Area (1993-1996), Transport Area (1997-2003) and Sub-IP Area (2001-2003). He was a member of the IESG (1993-2003) and was an elected trustee of the Internet Society (1993-1999), where he was the VP for Standards from 1995 to 2003 and Secretary to the Board of Trustees from 2003 to 2016. Scott was also a member of the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA) as well as a trustee of the IETF Trust from 2012 to 2016. Mr. Bradner retired from Harvard University in 2016 after 50 years working there in the areas of in computer programming, system management, networking, IT security and identity management. He still does some patent related consulting.
Speakers
  • Speaker Scott Bradner, Harvard University, retired
12:30 - 13:00
Full Abstract

Since 1984, the .ORG domain has been the home of non-profits, families, projects and hobbies, and all the other noncommercial odds and ends that make the Internet more interesting than just a bunch of companies trying to sell you more junk. In November of last year, ex-ICANN-CEO Fadi Chehadi tried to borrow $1.135 billion to do a hostile takeover of .ORG, bypassing the multistakeholder and competitive processes which are intended to protect .ORG's registrants.

In this talk, I'll discuss a bit of the history of the .ORG domain and the politics that led to it being in such a precarious position. I'll discuss the specific dangers that .ORG registrants were facing, particularly to their privacy and the operational reliability of the domain and all of the infrastructure (think the Red Cross, the World Bank, the United Nations, and the IATA) that depends upon it. I'll talk about how .ORG registrants organized to fight the threat, and why that fight is a long way from over. This talk will delve a bit into the governance mechanisms that were built into ICANN, and how those have been eroded in the 22 years since its establishment. Finally, I'll suggest a few changes that could protect .ORG and other domains from these dangers in the future.

Speakers
  • Speaker Bill Woodcock, Packet Clearing House
13:00 - 13:45
Recordings
Files
Full Abstract

RPKI deployment practices at Tier 1s

Speakers
  • Moderator Mark Kosters, ARIN
  • Panelist Adam Davenport, GTT
  • Carl Fredrik Lagerfeldt, Telia Carrier
  • Nimrod Levy
13:45 - 14:15
Full Abstract

From recent news: "NTT announced that it deployed RPKI-based BGP Origin Validation on its Global IP Network, starting on 25 March, resulting in the rejection of RPKI Invalid BGP route announcements on AS 2914 EBGP sessions. This change positively impacts the internet routing system."

But... how did we get there? What exactly improved? What does NTT deploying RPKI OV mean for other network providers? What does RPKI mean for troubleshooting? What to consider when deploying RPKI OV in your own network?

Through this talk I hope to share experiences from NTT's RPKI OV deployment.

Speakers
  • Speaker Job Snijders, NTT
14:15 - 15:00
Full Abstract

Join with peers in a Zoom Session breakout room to discuss one of the following topics:
Peering
Automation
Network telemetry
Virtual social events & hallway talk
How to run a distributed/WFH NOC during pandemic
Job Hunting
Internet Routing
Involvement in other industry standards events
IRRs/RPKI
Open networking
Just let the Session host know which BOF you'd like to join when you join the zoom meeting.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://nanog.zoom.us/j/91341691368?pwd=QVBJNHRxSjFnbDhJL0l6a0hxZllXUT09

Meeting ID: 913 4169 1368
Password: 331390
One tap mobile
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+13126266799,,91341691368# US (Chicago)

15:00 - 15:35
Full Abstract

This tutorial describes the evolution of IP Fast Reroute (FRR). It covers Loop Free Alternates (LFA), Remote LFA (RLFA), and Topology Independent LFA (TI-LFA).

IP FRR computes a restoration path to be used in case of link failure. When a link fails, the node immediately upstream of the failure shifts traffic to the restoration path, preserving connectivity while routing protocols converge.

Each stage of IP FRR evolution represents an improvement in its ability to support any network topology.

Speakers
  • Speaker Ron Bonica, Juniper Networks
15:35 - 16:20
Recordings
Files
Full Abstract

A quick overview of 5G from a network operator's viewpoint, including:
* . Finding towers, and where 5G is rolled out (Like Monaco)
* . What 5G isn't (like, MIMO is really already here)
* Three key 5G technologies, like CRAN and virtualization
* Common 5G misconceptions and controversies, like Chinese 5G
* Key 5G troubleshooting equipment
Where to get more help.

Right now this is 27 slides. It is expected to last about 20 minutes.

Speakers
  • Speaker Jon Drew Hess, Technical Writer, Hess Communications
  • Joe Hess, Hess Communications
16:20 - 16:40
Full Abstract

Network and services monitoring is crucial for quality and security. This can explain the rise of Distributed Measurement Systems (DMS): Devices deployed over networks, embedding monitoring applications periodically testing network and services and retrieving measurements further used for dashboarding, alerting, etc. Examples of DMS range from private infrastructures deployed by ISPs to measure end users « QoE » (e.g. SamKnows, IpLabel, home made) to large scale public infrastructures (e.g. RIPE Atlas, CAIDA Ark) that can be used for Internet Tomography studies.

Designing DMS is challenging especially as they must scale and provide reliable measurements. Especially, when many applications are collocated on the same machines, one has to make sure they do not compete for resources while executing as to not bias the collected measurements. To this end, we propose the NMaaS, an open-source platform, publicly available which enables to deploy and manage containerized measurement applications on a pool of physical machines.

An NMaaS instance is accessible via an online application allowing users to: choose monitoring applications from a pre-defined catalog to be deployed on machines in the network; visualize and manage their pool of machines, as well as the monitoring applications deployed on them; examine the results of the measurements and alerts raised. The first catalog contains: an IP spoofing detection app; a web (resp. streaming) QoS measure app; a web (resp. streaming) cartography app. The goal is then to motivate users to propose new apps to be added to the catalog. Furthermore, we propose and develop a scheduler for our NMaaS solution to make sure monitoring applications do not compete for resources while executing as to not bias the collected measurements.

In terms of implementation, a cluster of Docker containers is provisioned by Kubernetes to orchestrate the deployment of applications across the nodes by following a master-worker pattern. It is automatically set up by Ansible for node scalability, monitored by Prometheus by means of node exporters and sketched by Grafana to give an overview of the platform. Additionally, AlertManager sends notifications whenever an explicit metric reaches a threshold.

As a conclusion, the NMaaS allows rationalizing network and service monitoring, while scaling and ensuring accurate measurements. Gains are numerous: open source and publicly available for the community to use and extend; automation in deployment and use (no need to go on site to deploy new measurement applications making the solution lock down friendly); easy and rapid integration of applications to the platform thanks to the catalog system and its container-based architecture and finally the ACS-based scheduler that enables proper resource allocation. So far, only the platform itself is available, the scheduler and the apps catalog are to be released soon.

Anthony Lambert: Research Engineer at Orange Labs. I received my PhD in 2009, on Internet cartography and BGP routing improvement. My research topics include network monitoring, anomaly detection and automation.
Raquel Rugani Lage: Research engineer and PhD. student at Orange Labs and Telecom SudParis, on Internet cartography, allocation and scheduling of measurements applications to improve IP networks security.
Bryan To Van Trang: DevOps engineer student at Orange Labs, on IP networks monitoring and automation.
Speakers
  • Speaker Anthony Lambert
  • Raquel Rugani Lage
  • Bryan To Van Trang
16:40 - 17:30
Full Abstract

An update by NANOG Executive Director Edward McNair and NANOG PC leadership, with a live Q&A + real-time polling.

Speakers
  • Speaker Edward McNair, NANOG
  • Tina Morris, Amazon Web Services
  • Vincent Celindro, Juniper Networks